FORMATION - COORDINATES - COMPASS POINTS - GRID REFERENCE - DIRECTIONS - KEY - LOCATE

This half term we are learning about...

Prince William

   

FAMOUS GEOGRAPHY STUDENT

 Prince William, Duke of Cambridge,  (born 21 June 1982) is a member of the British royal family. He is the elder son of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Diana, Princess of Wales. Since birth, he has been second in the line to succeed his grandmother Elizabeth II, who is queen of the United Kingdom and 15 other Commonwealth realms.


William was educated at four schools in the United Kingdom and studied for a degree at the University of St. Andrews. During a gap year, he spent time in Chile, Belize, and Africa. In December 2006, he completed 44 weeks of training as an officer cadet and was commissioned in the Blues and Royals regiment. In April 2008, William completed pilot training at Royal Air Force College Cranwell, then underwent helicopter flight training and became a full-time pilot with the RAF Search and Rescue Force in early 2009. His service with the British Armed Forces ended in September 2013. He then trained for a civil pilot's licence and spent over two years working as a pilot for the East Anglian Air Ambulance.
In 2011, Prince William was made Duke of Cambridge and married Catherine Middleton. The couple have three children: Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis. 

 

After completing his studies at Eton, William took a gap year, during which he took part in British Army training exercises in Belize,worked on English dairy farms, visited Africa, and for ten weeks taught children in southern Chile. As part of the Raleigh International programme in the town of Tortel, William lived with other young volunteers, sharing in the common household chores—including cleaning the toilet—and also volunteered as a guest disc jockey at a local radio station. His interest in African culture prompted him to teach himself Swahili.

By 2001, William was back in the United Kingdom and had enrolled at the University of St Andrews. News of this caused a temporary increase in the number of applications to St Andrews, mostly from young women who wanted an opportunity to meet him. The extra attention did not deter him; he embarked on a degree course in Art History, later changing his main subject to Geography, and earned a Scottish Master of Arts degree with upper second class honours.

 

 

 

AT AJS WE LEARN...

In Geography lessons children will be taught:

Locational Knowledge
- Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities.
- Name and locate countries and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns: and understand how some of this aspects have changed over time.
- Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic, Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night).

Place Knowledge— understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country and a region within North or South America.

Human and Physical Geography—describe and understand the key aspects of:
- physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.
- human geography, including types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Geography Skills and Fieldwork
- use maps, atlases, globes and digital / computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.
- use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of an Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.
- use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features.

GEOGRAPHY - OUR AIMS AND OBJECTIVES ARE...

Purpose of study


A high-quality geography curriculum will inspire pupils curiosity and fascination about the world and its people. It will equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. Geography should help deepen their knowledge and understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and changed over time.
 

Aims
The national curriculum for geography aims to ensure that all pupils:
* develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places, both terrestrial and marine. This includes their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
* understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time. * are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
- collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
- interpret a range of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
- communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

At Airedale Juniors we aim to ensure Geography provokes and answers questions about the natural and human world, using different scales of enquiry to view them from different perspectives. It develops knowledge of places and environment throughout the world, an understanding of maps, and a range of investigative and problem solving skills both inside and outside the classroom. As children study geography, they encounter different societies and cultures. It can inspire them to think about their own place in the world, their values and their rights and responsibilities to other people and for our planet as a whole.