TESTING - FAIR - EXPERIMENT - HYPOTHESIS - PREDICT - RECORD - CONCLUDE - OBSERVE - MEASURE

Look at what we learn in science...

Look at some of the things we have done recently! Year 5 and 6 have taken part in some amazing experiments!

FAMOUS IN THIS FIELD

  • Occupation: Scientist
  • Born: November 7, 1867 in Warsaw, Poland
  • Died: July 4, 1934 in Passy, Haute-Savoie, France
  • Best known for: Her work in radioactivity

Where did Marie Curie grow up? Marie Curie grew up in Warsaw, Poland where she was born on November 7, 1867. Her birth name was Maria Sklodowska, but her family called her Manya. Her parents were both teachers. Her dad taught math and physics and her mom was headmistress at a girl's school. Marie was the youngest of five children. Growing up the child of two teachers, Marie was taught to read and write early. She was a very bright child and did well in school. She had a sharp memory and worked hard on her studies. Tough Times in Poland As Marie grew older her family came upon tough times. Poland was under the control of Russia at the time. People were not even allowed to read or write anything in the Polish language. Her father lost his job because he was in favor of Polish rule. Within a couple of years of one another both her sister and mother passed away. After graduating from high school, Marie wanted to attend a university, but this wasn't something that young women did in Poland in the 1800s. The university was for men. However, there was a famous university in Paris, France called the Sorbonne that women could attend. Marie did not have the money to go there, but agreed to work to help pay for her sister Bronislawa to go to school in France, if she would help Marie after she graduated. Marie arrived in France in 1891. In order to fit in, she changed her name from Manya to Marie. Marie lived the life of a poor college student, but she loved every minute of it. She was learning so much. After three years she earned her degree in Physics. In 1894 Marie met Pierre Curie. Like Marie, he was a scientist and the two of them fell in love. They married a year later and soon had their first child, a daughter named Irene.

Scientific Discoveries Marie became fascinated by rays that were recently discovered by scientists Wilhelm Roentgen and Henri Becquerel. Roentgen discovered X-rays and Becquerel had found rays given off by an element called uranium. Marie began to do experiments.One day Marie was examining a material called pitchblende. She expected there to be a few rays from the uranium in pitchblende, but instead Marie found a lot of rays. She soon realized that there must be a new, undiscovered element in pitchblende. Marie and her husband spent many hours in the science lab investigating pitchblende and the new element. They eventually figured out that there were two new elements in pitchblende. They had discovered two new elements for the periodic table! Marie named one of the elements polonium after her homeland Poland. She named the other radium, because it gave off such strong rays. The Curies came up with the term "radioactivity" to describe elements that emitted strong rays.

Nobel Prizes In 1903, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Marie and Pierre Curie as well as Henri Becquerel for their work in radiation. Marie became the first woman to be awarded the prize. In 1911 Marie won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discovering the two elements, polonium and radium. She was the first person to be awarded two Nobel Prizes. Marie became very famous. Scientists came from around the world to study radioactivity with Marie. Soon doctors found that radiology could help with curing cancer. World War I When World War I started Marie learned that doctors could use X-rays to help determine what was wrong with an injured soldier. However, there weren't enough X-ray machines for every hospital to have one. She came up with the idea that the X-ray machines could move from hospital to hospital in a truck. Marie even helped to train people to run the machines. The trucks became known as petites Curies, meaning "little Curies" and are thought to have helped over 1 million soldiers during the war. Death Marie died on July 4, 1934. She died from overexposure to radiation, both from her experiments and from her work with X-ray machines.

 AT AJS WE LEARN...

 

Our Science Curriculum 18-19... 

 

SCIENCE - OUR AIMS AND OBJECTIVES ARE...

Purpose of Study:

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

Aims:

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

·         Develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics

·      Develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them

·      Are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

In lower Key Stage 2 (Years 3 and 4) at Airedale pupils will be taught to: broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday ideas and the relationships between living things and different environments. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about how best to answer their questions. They should understand the meaning of a fair test, make predictions and draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language.

In upper Key Stage 2 (Years 5 and 6) at Airedale pupils will be taught to: explore ideas and ask different kinds of questions. They should begin to select and plan the most appropriate type of scientific experiments to answer scientific questions. This will include setting up a fair experiment and understanding the term variables. They should use and develop keys and other information records to identify, classify and describe living things and materials, and identify patterns that might be found in the natural environment. They should make their own decisions about what observations to make, what measurements to use and how long to make them for, and whether to repeat them; choose the most appropriate equipment to make measurements and explain how to use it accurately. They should use scientific language and illustrations to discuss and justify their scientific ideas and should talk about how scientific ideas have developed over time.